DNA Testing

General Services

DNA Testing

At All Creatures we offer genetic / DNA testing for your pet.

Why should you DNA test your dog or cat?

DNA testing your pedigree dog or cat (and also checking the DNA status of suitable mates) prior to breeding is important to prevent hereditary diseases caused by mutations being passed onto the puppies and kittens. Many of these inherited diseases can have a terrible impact on the health and welfare of future generations of pups and kittens. Responsible breeders will have their breeding stock DNA tested to secure the healthy future of the breed and also to make their puppies and kittens potentially more valuable to purchasers who want to minimise the risk of buying a pet with health problems. Some dogs and cats can carry harmful genes without showing signs of the disease (they are called "carriers") but when two carriers are bred, some pups or kittens may be born with the genetic ailment. Breed clubs aim to eradicate inherited conditions from the breed. We are happy to advise breeders and clubs on the best way to use the DNA tests for their breed.

Most of the tests are carried out by taking a cheek swab from your pet but some of the tests require a sample of blood.

Some test results are back within 2 weeks but please allow 4 weeks to get the results of your pet's DNA test. 

International Sheep Dog Society (ISDS) collie eye testing.

We have taken blood samples from hundreds of collies from all over Northern Ireland and Republic of Ireland to screen for Collie Eye Anomaly (CEA). For OptiGen CEA/CH results to be recorded by the ISDS for dog registration purposes, the following requirements must be met:

  1. Blood samples must be taken and shipped by a staff member of a nationally registered veterinary clinic with the clinic stamp applied to the Sample Submission Form.
  2. The dog owner should present to the clinic the ISDS Registration Certificate for inspection and verification.
  3. The dog must have a microchip fitted and the clinic must verify and record that number as well as the ISDS Number.
  4. The Sample Submission Form must be copied and a copy sent by the owner to the ISDS with the test result when received. A copy of the test result report is sufficient, the OptiGen Certificate should not be sent.
At All Creatures, we can complete all the necessary paperwork for the laboratory submission of your working dog's test.

For more information on the collie eye scheme check out

http://www.isds.org.uk/dog-registration/eye-schemes-and-registration-rules/cea-testing-dna/

Breeds and their genetic conditions that we can help you test for at All Creatures, Limavady, include....

  • American Cocker Spaniel - Phosphofructokinase deficiency - Progressive retinal atrophy (prcd-PRA)
  • American Staffordshire Terrier - Urate Stones – Uric Acid Excretion (Canine Hyperuricosuria)
  • Australian Cattle Dog - Primary Lens Luxation (PLL) - Progressive retinal atrophy
  • Australian Shepherd - Hereditary Cataract Urate Stones – Uric Acid Excretion (Canine Hyperuricosuria) - Multidrug Resistance Gene: mdr1 mutation (Ivermectin Sensitivity) - Progressive retinal atrophy (prcd-PRA)
  • Basset Hound - Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG)
  • Beagle - Musladin- Lueke Syndrome - Coagulation Factor VII Deficiency - Neonatal Cerebellar Cortical Degeneration and Coagulation Factor VII Deficiency
  • Bedlington Terrier - Copper Toxicosis
  • Bernese Mountain Dog - Von Willebrand-disease
  • Border Collie - Multidrug Resistance Gene: mdr1 mutation (Ivermectin Sensitivity) - Sensory neuropathy - Trapped neutrophil syndrome - Vitamin B12 (IGS) deficiency - Collie eye anomaly (CEA)
  • Boston Terrier - Early Onset Hereditary Cataracts
  • Briard - Congenital Stationary Night Blindness
  • Bulldog - Urate Stones – Uric Acid Excretion (Canine Hyperuricosuria)
  • Cavalier King Charles Spaniel - Curly Coat Dry Eye - Episodic Falling
  • Chesapeake Bay Retriever - Exercise induced collapse (EIC) - Progressive retinal atrophy (prcd-PRA)
  • Chinese Crested Dog - Primary Lens Luxation (PLL) - Progressive retinal atrophy (prcd-PRA) 
  • Cockerpoo - Progressive retinal atrophy (prcd-PRA)
  • Curly Coated Retriever - Exercise induced collapse (EIC)
  • Miniature Wire Haired Dachshund  - CRD (NHPH4) - Progressive Retinal Atrophy - Progressive Retinal Atrophy (cord1)
  • Miniature Long Haired Dachshund - Progressive Retinal Atrophy (cord1)
  • Miniature Smooth Haired Dachshund - Progressive Retinal Atrophy (cord1)
  • Dalmatian - Urate Stones – Uric Acid Excretion (Canine Hyperuricosuria)
  • Doberman - Von Willebrand-disease
  • English Cocker Spaniel - Familial nephropathy - Progressive retinal atrophy (prcd-PRA) 
  • English Shepherd - Multidrug Resistance Gene: mdr1 mutation (Ivermectin Sensitivity)
  • English Springer Spaniel - Fucosidosis - Phosphofructokinase Deficiency - Progressive Retinal Atrophy (cord1) 
  • Finnish Lapphunds - Pompe Disease
  • French Bulldog - Hereditary Cataract 
  • German Pointer - Von Willebrand-disease
  • German Shepherd - Multidrug Resistance Gene: mdr1 mutation (Ivermectin Sensitivity) - Urate Stones – Uric Acid Excretion (Canine Hyperuricosuria)
  • Giant Schnauzer - Urate Stones – Uric Acid Excretion (Canine Hyperuricosuria)
  • Golden Retriever - Progressive Retinal Atrophy 1 Progressive Retinal Atrophy 2
  • Golden Doodle - Progressive retinal atrophy (prcd-PRA)
  • Gordon Setter - Progressive Retinal Atrophy (rcd4)
  • Irish Red & White Setter - Canine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency - Progressive Retinal Atrophy (rcd1) - Von Willebrands Disease
  • Irish Setter - Canine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency - Progressive Retinal Atrophy (rcd1) Progressive Retinal Atrophy (rcd4)
  • Jack Russell Terrier - Late Onset Ataxia - Primary Lens Luxation (PLL) - Spinocerebellar Ataxia
  • Jagd Terrier - Primary Lens Luxation (PLL) 
  • Kerry Blue Terrier - Von Willebrand-disease
  • Labrador Retriever - Centronuclear Myopathy - Macular Corneal Dystrophy - Urate Stones – Uric Acid Excretion (Canine Hyperuricosuria)- Exercise induced collapse - Progressive retinal atrophy (prcd-PRA)
  • Labradoodle - Progressive retinal atrophy (prcd-PRA)
  • Lancashire Heeler  - Primary Lens Luxation (PLL) 
  • Landseer -  Cystinuria
  • Large Musterlander  - Urate Stones – Uric Acid Excretion (Canine Hyperuricosuria)
  • Leonberger - Juvenile-Onset Inherited  - Polyneuropathy
  • Manchester Terrier - Von Willebrand-disease
  • McNab Shepherds - Multidrug Resistance Gene: mdr1 mutation (Ivermectin Sensitivity)
  • Miniature Australian Shepherd - Multidrug Resistance Gene: mdr1 mutation (Ivermectin Sensitivity) - Progressive retinal atrophy 
  • Miniature Wire Haired Dachshund - CRD (NHPH4) - Progressive Retinal Atrophy - Progressive Retinal Atrophy (cord1)
  • Miniature Bull Terrier - Primary Lens Luxation (PLL)
  • Miniature Long Haired Dachshund - Progressive Retinal Atrophy (cord1)
  • Miniature Poodle - Progressive retinal atrophy (prcd-PRA)
  • Miniature Schnauzer - Demyelinating polyneuropathy
  • Miniature Smooth Haired Dachshund - Progressive Retinal Atrophy (cord1)
  • Newfoundland - Cystinuria
  • Norwegian Elkhound - Progressive retinal atrophy (prcd-PRA)
  • Old English Sheepdog - Multidrug Resistance Gene: mdr1 mutation (Ivermectin Sensitivity)
  • Papillon - Von Willebrand-disease
  • Parson Russell Terrier - Late Onset Ataxia - Primary Lens Luxation (PLL) - Spinocerebellar Ataxia - Urate Stones – Uric Acid Excretion (Canine Hyperuricosuria)
  • Patterdale Terrier - Primary Lens Luxation (PLL)
  • Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen - Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG)
  • Pomeranian - Urate Stones – Uric Acid Excretion (Canine Hyperuricosuria)
  • Poodle - Von Willebrand-disease
  • Portuguese Waterdog - Progressive retinal atrophy (prcd-PRA)
  • Rat Terrier - Primary Lens Luxation (PLL)
  • Rough Collie - Multidrug Resistance Gene: mdr1 mutation (Ivermectin Sensitivity)
  • Russian Black Terrier - Urate Stones – Uric Acid Excretion (Canine Hyperuricosuria)
  • Saint Bernard - Juvenile-Onset Inherited Polyneuropath
  • Sealyham Terrier - Primary Lens Luxation (PLL) 
  • Scotch Terrier - Von Willebrand-disease
  • Scottish Deerhound - Coagulation Factor VII Deficiency
  • Shetland Sheepdog - Multidrug Resistance Gene: mdr1 mutation (Ivermectin Sensitivity) - Von Willebrand-disease
  • Silky Terrier - Progressive retinal atrophy (prcd-PRA)
  • South African Boerbeol - Urate Stones – Uric Acid Excretion (Canine Hyperuricosuria)
  • Spanish Water Dog - Urate Stones – Uric Acid Excretion (Canine Hyperuricosuria) - Spinone Cerebellar Ataxia
  • Staffordshire Bull Terrier - Hereditary Cataract - L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria  (L2 HGA)
  • Standard Wire Haired Dachshund - CRD (NHPH4) Progressive Retinal Atrophy
  • Swedish Lapphunds - Pompe Disease
  • Tenterfield Terrier -  Primary Lens Luxation (PLL) 
  • Tibetan Spaniel - Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA3)
  • Tibetan Terrier - Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis - Primary Lens Luxation (PLL) - Progressive Retinal Atrophy (rcd4) - Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA3)
  • Toy Fox Terrier Primary Lens Luxation (PLL)
  • Toy poodle - Progressive retinal atrophy (prcd-PRA)
  • Volpino Italiano - Primary Lens Luxation (PLL) 
  • Weimaraner - Urate Stones – Uric Acid Excretion (Canine Hyperuricosuria) 
  • Welsh Corgi - Von Willebrand-disease
  • Welsh Terrier - Primary Lens Luxation (PLL)
  • Wire Haired Fox Terrier - Primary Lens Luxation (PLL)
  • Wire Haired Viszla - Urate Stones – Uric Acid Excretion (Canine Hyperuricosuria)
  • Yorkshire Terrier - Primary Lens Luxation (PLL) - Progressive retinal atrophy (prcd-PRA)

So what breeds are in your mixed breed or cross bred dog?

At All Creatures, we can help you find out exactly what breeds are in your crossbred pooch. This can be important as it is a way of helping to highlight any breed related health issues which your pet can be prone to or to help as estimate the lifespan of your dog. Or simply you might just be curious to know exactly what he or she is! This DNA test covers more than 185 breeds including all those recognised by The Kennel Club. The test will reveal you dog's genetic background back to the great-grandparent level. The test can be run for mixed-breed, designer, or purebred dogs. In addition to an ancestry chart the report will provide a predicted weight profile to keep a healthy Body Condition Score. The test currently costs £89.95 and involves taking a cheek swab from your dog. The vets at All Creatures will ensure that a good cheek swab is taking ensuring maximum accuracy. The results of the test take around 3 weeks. 


Genetic parentage testing at All Creatures

We require samples from the mother, the offspring and the father(s). If there is a possibility of more than one father we need samples from each father. As there is always the possibility of a split litter (different pups having different fathers), to be sure of the parentage for all the puppies we would recommend that you test the full litter. Pups must be at least 4 weeks to carry out the test and is done by either blood sampling or cheek swabs.


Genetic testing for pedigree cats at All Creatures

We offer testing for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in Maine Coons, Ragdolls and their crosses. We offer testing for Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) in Persians, Himalayans, Siamese, Ragdolls, European Shorthairs, American Shorthairs, British Shorthairs, Exotic Shorhairs, Selkirk Rexs and Scottish Folds. Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency can be tested for in Abyssinian and Somali cats. These tests require a blood sample from your pet.